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Posts Tagged ‘Training Principles’

Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Progression

This is the third installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression.

Progression – Strategy of advancing exercise loads so that improvements will continue over time.

When progression is applied properly it will promote long-term training benefits.  While it is customary to focus only on the load that is lifted, training intensity can be progressively increased by raising the number of weekly training sessions, adding more drills or exercises to each session, change the type or difficulty of the drills or exercises, or increasing the training stimulus.

Progression should be based on the athlete’s training status and is introduced systematically and gradually.

In order to improve your wakeboarding, you should gradually progress from basic exercises to more complex and challenging exercises.

An example of this would be performing an exercise on a stable surface and then as your strength increases and you get a good strength base, progress to performing the exercise on an unstable surface.

A couple of sample exercise progressions would be:

-Dumbbell bench press -> Dumbbell stability ball bench press

-Dumbbell row (on a bench) -> Dumbbell row (1 hand on a stability ball)

After building up a solid strength base, be sure to progress to new and more challenging exercises in order to improve your wakeboarding.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Overload

This is the second installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression

Overload – assigning a workout or training regime of greater intensity that the athlete is accustomed to.

Without the overload principle, even a well designed program will greatly limit an athlete’s ability to make improvements.

One obvious application of the overload principle, in a resistance training program, involves an increasing the load (weight) lifted during an exercise.  Other changes that can be made to “overload” include: increasing the number of sessions per week (or per day in some instances), adding exercises or sets, emphasize complex over simple exercises, decrease length of rest period between sets and exercises, or any combination of these or other changes.

As long as the body is stressed at higher level than it is used to, an overload will occur.

When the body is properly overloaded, overtraining is avoided and the desired training adaptation will occur.

Be sure to make sure you “overload” in order to take your wakeboarding to the next level.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Specificity

This is the first installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression.

Specificity – method of training an athlete in a specific manner to produce a specific adaptation or training outcome. 

An example of this would be, if you would like to strengthen your chest muscles, you would need to perform exercises that target the pectoralis major (push-ups, bench press, DB bench press, etc.)

Another term that can be used interchangeably with specificity is SAID, Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands.  In other words, they type of stress and demand that you place on your body will determine the type of adaptation that will occur.

For example, a baseball pitcher would need to perform movements that place an emphasis on power in high-speed movements.  This will help to activate and recruit the same motor units that are needed in order to perform their sport at the highest level.  By performing strength training exercises that mimic the movement patterns of an athlete’s sport, this will increase the likelihood that these muscles will be recruited.

Specificity also relates to an athlete’s sport season.  As you go through pre-season, in-season, and postseason every form of training should progress in an organized manner from general to sport specific.  While participation in a sport itself is the optimal way to improve performance, the proper application of a well designed strength training program will also positively contribute to performance.

In order to have a wakeboard specific strength training program you should include exercises that involve: squatting, pulling, rotating, and jumping (plyometrics) just to name a few.  The exercises in your strength training program should also be multi-joint, compound movements (squats, rows, lunges, pull-ups, chin-ups, etc.)

Think about it for a minute, wakeboarding is a FULL body activity all of the time, even if you are just standing on the board.  Therefore, I’m sorry I have to break this to you, exercises that target specific muscles aren’t going to do you much good.  This means bicep curls, tricep extensions, calf raises, etc. aren’t going to help you improve your on the water performance as much as full body, multi-joint, compound movements.

Stick to the chin-ups instead of the DB curls and you will see your wakeboarding improve that much more.  (Plus your biceps will probably get better “results” than if you stick with doing curls.)

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – Be sure to post any comments and questions that you might have.