Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Stability Ball’

Wakeboard Workout Wednesday #5 – Stability Ball Reverse Crunch

The 5th wakeboard workout is the stability ball reverse crunch.  This is a great exercise for your core.  Your core must not only work to stabilize the stability ball, but also to pull the ball up towards your chest. 

WARNING: Use the information in this video at your own risk. Please consult your physician before participating in an exercise program. Wake 2 Wake Fitness does not take responsibility for any type of injuries that occur from following the listed videos.

Read more…

Clock in and do work…

Guest blog by Alwyn Cosgrove.

There are days when you train like a grizzly bear – the weight feels light, you move the bar or dumbbells fast, and you have cardio that could go for hours.

And there are days when you train more like a teddy bear! You keep checking the weights because there is no way that it should feel as heavy as it is.

But it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.

Anyone can train hard when they feel like it. But the difference in results comes with the less-than-spectacular workouts – the “punch the clock” workouts.

” Not all workouts have to look like a scene from “Pumping Iron.” In fact, I often argue that these moderate workouts…the punch the clock workouts…are the ones that make champions. Hell, everyone is willing to work hard the week of the State Championship: I think what separates champions is the willingness to just get “them”…the workouts…in.”
-Dan John

Sometimes you just have to “clock in and do work” as Robert Dos Remedios says.

Consistency is a major key to success in any area. Sometimes it’s just getting another session done…

I always suggest to clients that they set a goal of X workouts in Y number of days/weeks. Of course we want to set records, and have great workouts – but there is a need for just being consistent with the training sessions and just checking them off.


AC

Just like your workouts, some days you wakeboard better than you do on other days.  The most important thing to do is go out, have fun, and try to get better every time that you ride.

It is the days that you aren’t riding well that determine how much you improve and “it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.”

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

P.S. – For more info and articles from Alwyn Cosgrove – Check out alwyncosgrove.com

Building Work Capacity…

Guest blog by Robert Dos Remedios.

Building Work Capacity….

I’m often asked about my goals in my conditioning programming and my answer always seems to come back to one thing, WORK CAPACITY. If we can continue to turn the knob up and get more and more out of our athletes we will build their ability to keep pushing, to improve their all-important strength and power endurance. In essence we are assuring that over time, we will also be able to train harder and harder for longer periods of time with greater intensity. Perhaps most importantly, work capacity building sessions helps to forge amazing confidence…this is often the psychological variable that can be the difference between victory and defeat.

We push that envelope early and often with our football athletes, here is an example of a post-lifting fieldwork session….typical to what we have been doing since the beginning of February.

If you can increase your work capacity off of the water, it will only help you to improve your wakeboarding.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – For more information on Coach Dos checkout his website coachdos.com and his blog coachdos.blogspot.com.

Touch Your Core With Light Load/High Velocity Resistance Training

I just received the latest edition of the Performance Training Journal from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA.) In it they have a bunch of great articles about “Core Training.” The articles are very well written and state a lot of the same methods and beliefs that I have about “Core Training.”

In wakeboarding, it doesn’t matter what skill level you are, you are always using your “Core.” Because of this, it is vital that you maintain a strong and stable core so that you can ride harder, longer, throw that new invert, and add an extra 180 to all of your spins.

With that in mind, read the article below and let me know what you think about it. Also, be sure to leave a comment and let me know if you want to see some more articles and info about “Core Training.”

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Touch Your Core With Light Load/High Velocity Resistance Training
Kyle Brown, CSCS

One of the hottest fitness trends in the last decade has been core stability training. Unfortunately, this trend has led many athletes, as well as personal trainers, to move away from training major muscle groups and instead design entire workout programs around core training. Yet, as new research suggests, core strength does not significantly contribute to overall strength and power and shouldn’t be the main focus of a workout program (1). Many bodybuilders do not even do isolation movements for their core as they are aware of the fact that in nearly every standing resistance training exercise, the core must stabilize. Yet, while developing a strong core is important for increasing athletic performance, reducing likelihood of injury, and reducing existing pain levels, a strong core can be developed by stabilizing while simultaneously training your major muscle groups. A unique way to torch your core is with light load/high velocity resistance training, as you are able to train with high intensity at a sprinter’s pace.

A core stability exercise can be defined as “any exercise that channels motor patterns to ensure a stable spine through repetition” (2). Therefore, for example, squats, pull-ups, and standing overhead presses are all core stability exercises as they all require the core to stabilize. If your goal is to develop core strength and power while training major muscle groups, training at a high velocity can challenge your core. These explosive movements are very fast-paced, intense, high-energy, anaerobic movements that require a lot of muscle groups to fire simultaneously. This type of training allows the athlete to rapidly accelerate and achieve maximum velocity on every repetition. Moreover, the power output in a short amount of time is astounding. For example, if an athlete is able to do 25 repetitions with 40lbs cable presses in each hand (80 pounds total) in 20 seconds, that is 2,000lbs of power output in 20 seconds.

Rather than focus on how many repetitions to perform, instead focus on completing the maximum number of repetitions within a given time frame with high intensity and proper form. I cannot stress enough the importance of maintaining proper biomechanics while training at high velocity, as it will not only prevent injury, it will also effectively engage the proper muscles and lead to a more challenging workout. Too many times athletes, as well as trainers, sacrifice proper form for speed. To increase core activation, perform these exercises in a less stable environment. Marshall and Murphy compared muscle activity in the rectus abdominis, transversus/internal oblique abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and erector spinae when push-ups were performed on a Swiss ball versus a stable floor. The results demonstrated that at the top portion of the push-up, with the hands positioned on a Swiss ball, there was significantly greater activity in the rectus abdominis (35% vs. 9% of maximal activity) and transversus/internal oblique abdominis (33% vs. 13% of maximal activity) (3).

References

1. Nesser TW, Lee WL. The relationship between core strength and performance in Division I female soccer players. JEPonline 2009; 12(2):21 – 28.

2. Verstegen, M, and Williams, P. Physioball routine. In: Core Performance. New York, NY: Rodale, Inc., 2004. pp. 73 – 88.

3. Marshall, PW, and Murphy, BA. Core stability exercises on and off a Swiss ball. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 86: 242 – 249. 2005

5 Rules of Gym Etiquette

September 8, 2009 Leave a comment

I know that this doesn’t have to do with anything specifically related to improving your wakeboarding, but I just ran across this article on msn.com and thought EVERYONE who works out should read.  In my opinion, these are not the ONLY “unwritten” rules that should be followed in a gym, but it is a good starting point and also good reminders for everyone. 

Read the article below and be sure to post some of your “unwritten” rules, experiences, and stories from the gym.

 

Learn how not to wear out your welcome.

by Kristopher Kaiyala for MSN Health & Fitness
Everyone’s been the victim of Bad Gym Guy. You know the one: the smelly, sweaty, chatty health club member who spreads his body filth all over the locker room and exercise equipment, with nary a care for those around him. Bad Gym Guy cuts in line, slams the weights, talks loudly on his cell phone and seems generally oblivious to the world around him. Here’s our advice if you want to avoid him: don’t be him.

Gyms are social gathering places just like malls, coffee shops and work places. Basic rules of group politeness apply even if the club lured you into thinking it was there to cater to your every need.

So, what are the basic rules of gym etiquette? We enlisted the help of Chicago’s posh Lakeshore Athletic Clubs for the answers. Athletic director Diana Hoffman and head trainer Nancy Parks boast a combined total of more than 20 years in the fitness profession. They know Bad Gym Guy when they see him. Here are their tips to help you avoid becoming the fitness-club pariah:

1. Be quiet.

Cell phone use on the fitness floor is a definite no-no. No one wants to be party to your personal conversations; they distract from the mental focus everyone needs to achieve their fitness goals. “Also, if you are participating in a group exercise class, don’t talk in the back of the studio. It’s unfair to others participating in the class,” says Hoffman. You’re an adult. Don’t act like a grade schooler.

2. Clean off the machines.

You don’t want to sit in someone else’s sweat, so why make them sit in yours? “After using any type of equipment at the club, be sure to wipe it off,” says Parks. “Covering the seats or benches with a towel beforehand helps to avoid this problem, and it also protects you from germs that can be passed on through other people’s sweat.”

3. Be careful when handling weights.

Few things are more jarring at a gym than the loud clank of dropped dumbbells or barbells. Don’t permit the weight stack on any piece of equipment to slam down. “It is disruptive to others training in same area, is potentially damaging to equipment, and can cause injury to the user as it evidences an inability to control whatever weight is being used,” says Parks. “Also remember to put weights back when you are done; it’s thoughtless to leave them lying around.”

4. Share the equipment.

If you are circuit training, trade off sets with someone else, that way you can rest while someone else lifts. “If someone is already using a piece of equipment that you want to share, wait until they are done with their set before asking them,” says Hoffman. “If you ask them in the middle of a set, they may lose concentration. Even if they do respond, it could interfere with their breathing.” Cardio equipment must be shared as well. “Many clubs have time limits for these machines during their peak hours. Be sure to abide by these rules so everyone can benefit from the equipment.”

5. Watch your odor.

“Be sure to clean your workout clothes on a regular basis and don’t wear overbearing perfume or cologne,” says Hoffman. “Take a shower after your workout as well—you don’t want your smell to offend people on your way home, too!”

Yuck. We couldn’t have said it any better.

Stability Ball Weight Roll

September 3, 2009 Leave a comment

Here is a great exercise that will work your entire core area in one exercise.

In order to perform the stability ball weight roll, the only equipment that you will need will be a stability ball.  If you want to increase the intensity of the exercise, simply add your choice of a dumbbell, medicine ball, or a weight plate.

When you perform the exercise, begin with your head, neck, and shoulders on the stability ball.  Fully extend your hips while flexing your abs.

With both hands straight up in the air, simply roll your shoulders to one side of the ball, dropping your hands towards the floor.  Rotate your hips with your abs, while keeping them flexed through out the entire movement.  Alternate sides for 8-10 reps each side, 16-20 reps total, for 3 sets.

Click on the links below in order to view video clips of the stability ball weight roll.

SB Weight Roll – Front

SB Weight Roll – Side

Roger Ernst II, CSCS