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Posts Tagged ‘Interval Training’

Are we really working hard?

Guest blog by Alwyn Cosgrove

I think there are definite parallels between work and fitness training. Over the past few years I think as a whole, in both areas, we’ve confused working “hard” with working long.

Think about someone you know who you’d describe as working hard for a living. Now – do they really work hard – i.e. back breaking, intense physical labor — or do you mean that they work long hours – nights and maybe weekends?

Working “hard” and working “long” are not the same. And neither one means working effectively.

You could make the case that someone who is working long hours and weekends to achieve their objectives may not necessarily be working hard at all – they may be doing completely ineffective activities.

In addition, their rate of actual quality work output may be very low on a minute-by-minute basis. Or quality output may not be frequent enough — so they are trying to compensate by increasing their total volume.

But just increasing the volume of an ineffective, low-quality (i.e. intensity), infrequent activity isn’t helping whatsoever. Effective, results-producing work is not dependent upon the total volume of work primarily.

It’s the same as effective, results-producing exercise:

Effectiveness first.
Intensity second.
Frequency Third.
Volume last.

Is your training effective?
Are you focused and striving to do more work/lift more weight/do more reps in the session?
Are you training regularly? (in all studies – frequency of exposure to a stimulus is a primary key to success).

Once you have effective and technically sound exercise, performed with appropriate intensity on a regular basis – then you can think about adding volume. Doing more work can’t replace effectiveness, intensity or consistency.

AC

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – For more info and articles from Alwyn Cosgrove – Check out alwyncosgrove.com

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Cardio Strength Training

Do you think you don’t have enough time to workout?

Here is a great workout that you can do in only 20 min. that combines strength training as well cardio all in one.  The concept for this workout was taken from the book, Cardio Strength Training by Robert dos Remedios.  If you have not read this book, I HIGHLY recommend you go out and buy it as soon as possible.

 

I just finished up doing this workout…it is a killer.  Try it out and let me know what you think.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – Be sure to join the Wake 2 Wake Fitness Fan Page

4 Signs It’s Time to Change Your Workout Routine

Guest blog by Jen Mueller.

What to Do When Your Workout Isn’t Working for You

— By Jen Mueller, Certified Personal Trainer

When you started a regular exercise program, whether to lose weight or improve your overall health, your enthusiasm and motivation were high. Even though exercise wasn’t the most exciting activity you had experienced, you began feeling better and seeing results from your hard work. You managed to get yourself out of bed early, to squeeze in a little gym time each day, and stick to your plan without much effort.

But then slowly, the novelty began to wear off. You started finding reasons to sleep in and found “better” things to do with your time. Then before you realized it, you had missed a whole week and your drive to continue was missing in action. Is this common scenario just another motivation issue? Probably not. Could something else be getting in the way of the excitement and effectiveness of your previously-rewarding workouts? The answer is yes! Luckily, you can learn to identify the signs that it’s time to shake-up your workout routine so you can remain consistent and enthusiastic about exercise. Here are four of the most common signs and what you can do to get back on track:

Top 4 Signs Your Workout Isn’t Working

1. Your workout bores you.

You used to like walking on the treadmill, so why do you dread your workout each day? It’s easy to get bored if you stick with the same routine for too long. Sometimes it helps to add variety to your walks. For example, try taking your workout outside, adding speed intervals, putting new music on your iPod or bringing a friend along. If all of that isn’t enough, then maybe it’s time to try a new activity. Perhaps you’ve always wanted to try biking or are interested in a new class at your local gym. Change can help keep your workouts fun and interesting, giving you something to look forward to. And that is exactly what will keep you coming back for more.

2. Your workout isn’t giving you results anymore.

Someone who does the same activity all the time is likely to plateau much sooner than someone who varies her workouts. Just as you can get bored by always doing the same exercises, your body can also adapt to these exercises so that they don’t offer the same benefits that they once did. A little variety might be just the thing you need to get the scale moving again or bust through that strength plateau. “Variety” means either changing something about your current routine (adding speed, distance, hills, resistance, etc.) or trying a totally different activity. If you like some consistency and don’t want to change your workout each time you hit the gym, change your routine at least every 4-8 weeks (this includes incorporating changes to both your cardio and strength training exercises). This will keep your muscles challenged, your body guessing, and the results coming!

3. Your workout leaves you more tired and sore than before.

Exercise should give you more energy, not leave you feeling rundown. If you’re feeling overly tired or perpetually sore, you could be overtraining. Your body needs time for rest and recovery. It is during this down time that you build strength and endurance by allowing your muscles to rebuild and repair. If you don’t give your body ample recovery time, you’ll become weaker instead of stronger. If you have been overtraining, your first priority should be rest. You might need up to a week off to recharge mentally and physically. Once you are feeling better, start back slowly. Reevaluate your workout program and find ways to make changes that will prevent this from happening again.

4. Your workout is no longer challenging.

Running a 10-minute mile, for example, becomes easier as time goes on. If your workouts aren’t challenging you anymore, it can be helpful to wear a heart rate monitor. Your heart rate will change over time as you become more fit. By using a heart rate monitor, you’ll know to change up or intensify your routine, and ensure that you’re working in your target heart rate zone. Challenging your body improves your fitness level and can also provide a sense of accomplishment as you become stronger and work toward your goals.

Changing your workout routine whenever these signs arise will help keep your motivation high as you work to improve your fitness level. The key is to pay close attention to how you’re feeling both physically and mentally. Exercise shouldn’t be a chore that you dread, but something that makes you feel good about yourself!

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – To read the full article click here.

Clock in and do work…

Guest blog by Alwyn Cosgrove.

There are days when you train like a grizzly bear – the weight feels light, you move the bar or dumbbells fast, and you have cardio that could go for hours.

And there are days when you train more like a teddy bear! You keep checking the weights because there is no way that it should feel as heavy as it is.

But it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.

Anyone can train hard when they feel like it. But the difference in results comes with the less-than-spectacular workouts – the “punch the clock” workouts.

” Not all workouts have to look like a scene from “Pumping Iron.” In fact, I often argue that these moderate workouts…the punch the clock workouts…are the ones that make champions. Hell, everyone is willing to work hard the week of the State Championship: I think what separates champions is the willingness to just get “them”…the workouts…in.”
-Dan John

Sometimes you just have to “clock in and do work” as Robert Dos Remedios says.

Consistency is a major key to success in any area. Sometimes it’s just getting another session done…

I always suggest to clients that they set a goal of X workouts in Y number of days/weeks. Of course we want to set records, and have great workouts – but there is a need for just being consistent with the training sessions and just checking them off.


AC

Just like your workouts, some days you wakeboard better than you do on other days.  The most important thing to do is go out, have fun, and try to get better every time that you ride.

It is the days that you aren’t riding well that determine how much you improve and “it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.”

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

P.S. – For more info and articles from Alwyn Cosgrove – Check out alwyncosgrove.com

Short Term High-Intensity Interval Training (HIT) As Effective As Moderate Long Term Endurance Exercise, Study

Here is yet another article/study about the many benefits of interval training.

Click HERE to read the article.

Be sure to let me know what you think about the article and the study in the comments section.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Overload

This is the second installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression

Overload – assigning a workout or training regime of greater intensity that the athlete is accustomed to.

Without the overload principle, even a well designed program will greatly limit an athlete’s ability to make improvements.

One obvious application of the overload principle, in a resistance training program, involves an increasing the load (weight) lifted during an exercise.  Other changes that can be made to “overload” include: increasing the number of sessions per week (or per day in some instances), adding exercises or sets, emphasize complex over simple exercises, decrease length of rest period between sets and exercises, or any combination of these or other changes.

As long as the body is stressed at higher level than it is used to, an overload will occur.

When the body is properly overloaded, overtraining is avoided and the desired training adaptation will occur.

Be sure to make sure you “overload” in order to take your wakeboarding to the next level.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Building Work Capacity…

Guest blog by Robert Dos Remedios.

Building Work Capacity….

I’m often asked about my goals in my conditioning programming and my answer always seems to come back to one thing, WORK CAPACITY. If we can continue to turn the knob up and get more and more out of our athletes we will build their ability to keep pushing, to improve their all-important strength and power endurance. In essence we are assuring that over time, we will also be able to train harder and harder for longer periods of time with greater intensity. Perhaps most importantly, work capacity building sessions helps to forge amazing confidence…this is often the psychological variable that can be the difference between victory and defeat.

We push that envelope early and often with our football athletes, here is an example of a post-lifting fieldwork session….typical to what we have been doing since the beginning of February.

If you can increase your work capacity off of the water, it will only help you to improve your wakeboarding.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – For more information on Coach Dos checkout his website coachdos.com and his blog coachdos.blogspot.com.

Interval Training

If you aren’t doing interval training, you should be.

Interval training is great not only for fat loss and cutting down your workout time, but also for improving your wakeboarding.

Check out this article if you are still doing long slow cardio workouts.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS