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Wakeboard Workout Wednesday #2 – Swimmers

This week’s Wakeboard Workout is Swimmers.  All that you need for this exercise is a JC Band (Resistance Band) and a high attachment point (top of a door, pull-up bar, top of a squat rack, etc.)

WARNING: Use the information in this video at your own risk. Please consult your physician before participating in an exercise program. Wake 2 Wake Fitness does not take responsibility for any type of injuries that occur from following the listed videos.

Keeping your elbows straight throughout the entire movement, starting with your hands at approximately eye level, explosively drive your hands past your hips, pulling down with your shoulder blades.  Return your hands back up to eye level and repeat the movement.

Depending on the strength of the resistance band, perform 3-4 sets of 12-15 reps.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

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Wakeboard Workout Wednesday – #1 – Overhead Medicine Ball Slams

Today is the start of a video series called Wakeboard Workout Wednesday.  A new video will be posted every week that is designed to teach you some of the best exercises that you can do in order to help improve your wakeboarding.

The first Wakeboard Workout is the Medicine Ball Overhead Slam.

WARNING: Use the information in this video at your own risk. Please consult your physician before participating in an exercise program. Wake 2 Wake Fitness does not take responsibility for any type of injuries that occur from following the listed videos.

 

Read more…

Ride Strong with Darin Shapiro

This post was taken from an article that was written on wakeboardingmag.com.  Darin Shapiro is one of the most dedicated, decorated, and most experienced wakeboarders around.  His fitness training is what has allowed him to wakeboard at such a high level for so many years.  When Darin Shapiro talks about wakeboarding and working out, we should all listen.

If you follow the 5 principles that Darin Shapiro lays out in this article, you will improve you wakeboarding, fitness level, and help to prevent injuries.  Check out the video at the end of the article to see Darin “Ride Strong.”

wkb1009_howto_ridestrong

Words Darin Shapiro Photo Bryan Soderlind

Riding with power, intense edging, going big off the wake — they all require strength and a higher level of fitness than regular riding. Taking your riding to the next level, beyond the second wake, puts far more stress on your body than wake-to-wake riding. To ride at that next level, you need to take your body to the next level too. Charging the wake requires complete commitment and confidence, and the more prepared you are, the better. If you aspire to this style of riding, you need to pay close attention to your strength and fitness levels. Here are some things that have helped me stay fit while pushing a powerful style of riding.

My Philosophy From day one of my riding career, I always followed the philosophy of learn it small, take it big. This process involves learning the trick properly and being able to do it with control. From there, I work on taking it big by starting wide and charging it. Bigger riding requires more strength, because the dynamics get more and more intense. Greater rope tension, landing from higher up, bigger kicks off the wake — it all requires that extra bit of strength. There are many different types of training to help increase your physical performance. If you’re like me, the least exciting one is going to the gym.

Five Days a Week I keep my workout schedule fairly loose, but I’m active a minimum of five days a week, regardless of how much I ride. For wake-to-wake riders, 10 sets a week isn’t a ton of riding. If you’re charging big tricks every set, then five or six sessions a week is enough to take it out of you. So in addition to riding, I do a whole bunch of activities on a weekly basis. It’s important to work on strength, cardio and flexibility when preparing for big riding. A healthy diet is very important too.

Strive for Strength Powerful riding requires strength, but you don’t have to look like a muscle man. My favorite exercises include pull-ups, push-ups and core training. Pull-ups are an essential part of wakeboarding strength training, and they go hand in hand with the core and push-up exercises. I think its really important for people to understand that when doing these exercises, you really have to push yourself through them to see any benefit from your hard work. Keep changing your goals and targets to push yourself harder every time you exercise. Riding with power is all about commitment, so make sure you apply that same thought process to your preparation.

Go Beyond the Treadmill For my cardio, I mountain bike more than anything else. Often, I bike as much as five times a week. In addition, whenever the waves breaking I’ll head to the beach for the day to surf. It’s always fun to also throw in some wakesurfing for good measure when I can. As with the strength exercises, you have to push yourself to get the benefit from these activities. A consistent effort to do this will see your fitness levels increase at a faster rate, and you’ll receive much more benefit from the exercise.

Eat Right You might not want to hear it, but a healthy diet is a big part of making physical gains. I’m sure I don’t need to tell you that drinking all night and charging it the next morning is not a good idea. I always try to keep my diet as natural and as fresh as I can. I avoid all junk food and sugary drinks. In addition to my healthy eating habits, I take nutritional supplements. I have always used Shaklee nutritional products. It’s simple: If you eat well and keep things healthy, you’ll feel much better and be able to train and ride at a higher level.

I’m 35! I’ve been charging it hard on my wakeboard since 1991, and I rode on the Pro [Wakeboard] Tour longer than anyone in history. Sure, I’ve been injured, but through these principles, I have bounced back every time. Eight doctors have told I would never ride again, and yet I’m still here charging it. I have always pushed myself to be a better athlete, and fitness and diet have played a major role in my success. So try to follow some of these principles. Hopefully, you will still be riding with power at 35 and beyond.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

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Are we really working hard?

Guest blog by Alwyn Cosgrove

I think there are definite parallels between work and fitness training. Over the past few years I think as a whole, in both areas, we’ve confused working “hard” with working long.

Think about someone you know who you’d describe as working hard for a living. Now – do they really work hard – i.e. back breaking, intense physical labor — or do you mean that they work long hours – nights and maybe weekends?

Working “hard” and working “long” are not the same. And neither one means working effectively.

You could make the case that someone who is working long hours and weekends to achieve their objectives may not necessarily be working hard at all – they may be doing completely ineffective activities.

In addition, their rate of actual quality work output may be very low on a minute-by-minute basis. Or quality output may not be frequent enough — so they are trying to compensate by increasing their total volume.

But just increasing the volume of an ineffective, low-quality (i.e. intensity), infrequent activity isn’t helping whatsoever. Effective, results-producing work is not dependent upon the total volume of work primarily.

It’s the same as effective, results-producing exercise:

Effectiveness first.
Intensity second.
Frequency Third.
Volume last.

Is your training effective?
Are you focused and striving to do more work/lift more weight/do more reps in the session?
Are you training regularly? (in all studies – frequency of exposure to a stimulus is a primary key to success).

Once you have effective and technically sound exercise, performed with appropriate intensity on a regular basis – then you can think about adding volume. Doing more work can’t replace effectiveness, intensity or consistency.

AC

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

PS – For more info and articles from Alwyn Cosgrove – Check out alwyncosgrove.com

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Cardio Strength Training

Do you think you don’t have enough time to workout?

Here is a great workout that you can do in only 20 min. that combines strength training as well cardio all in one.  The concept for this workout was taken from the book, Cardio Strength Training by Robert dos Remedios.  If you have not read this book, I HIGHLY recommend you go out and buy it as soon as possible.

 

I just finished up doing this workout…it is a killer.  Try it out and let me know what you think.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

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Turning Weakness into Strengths in the Off-Season

Guest blog by Kyle Brown, CSCS

Turning Weakness into Strengths in the Off-Season

Some athletes feel that the off-season is a time to let their bodies rest, fall completely off their diets, and spend this time partying the night away with little sleep or regard for their health and fitness. Typically, they use the pre-season as a time to rebound and acclimate to the demands of their sport. Yet, even as a weekend warrior, intramural or club athlete, having a year-round game plan will keep you a cut above the competition and ready to hit the ground running in the pre-season. Moreover, focusing on your weaknesses in the off-season will bring a new and improved you to the field next season.

Off-season training is not only the best time to recover from your sport physically and mentally, but it is also the perfect time to train to counteract all of the muscle imbalances inherent in playing nearly any sport. The off-season varies depending on the particular sport, but in general terms, off-season refers to the weeks after the in-season and before the pre-season (1).

There is a fine line between resting too much and too little in the off-season. Ideally, an athlete should take the time off their sport to mentally rest as well as not put their primary focus on training the main muscles utilized for their sport. Instead, after a short period of rest (referred to as an unloading week), an athlete should focus on cross training or working on their muscular weaknesses and imbalances to get refreshed without lowering their current fitness level. For example, some sports require one arm or leg to be utilized more or their opposing muscle groups are neglected (i.e., the quadriceps are working but the hamstrings are not utilized).

Some of the benefits of working on muscular imbalances during the off-season include: preventing chronic injuries, creating symmetry in strength and coordination, recovery of primary movers, strengthening of stabilizer muscles, and prevention of detraining or overtraining. During the off-season phase, a combination of resistance training and flexibility work will create stronger, less inhibited muscles.

References

1. Bompa TO, Periodization training for sports. 1999. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics

Kyle Brown, CSCS

Be sure to post any questions that you might have about off-season workouts as well as what you do in the off-season to stay in wakeboarding shape.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

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Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Progression

This is the third installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression.

Progression – Strategy of advancing exercise loads so that improvements will continue over time.

When progression is applied properly it will promote long-term training benefits.  While it is customary to focus only on the load that is lifted, training intensity can be progressively increased by raising the number of weekly training sessions, adding more drills or exercises to each session, change the type or difficulty of the drills or exercises, or increasing the training stimulus.

Progression should be based on the athlete’s training status and is introduced systematically and gradually.

In order to improve your wakeboarding, you should gradually progress from basic exercises to more complex and challenging exercises.

An example of this would be performing an exercise on a stable surface and then as your strength increases and you get a good strength base, progress to performing the exercise on an unstable surface.

A couple of sample exercise progressions would be:

-Dumbbell bench press -> Dumbbell stability ball bench press

-Dumbbell row (on a bench) -> Dumbbell row (1 hand on a stability ball)

After building up a solid strength base, be sure to progress to new and more challenging exercises in order to improve your wakeboarding.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Clock in and do work…

Guest blog by Alwyn Cosgrove.

There are days when you train like a grizzly bear – the weight feels light, you move the bar or dumbbells fast, and you have cardio that could go for hours.

And there are days when you train more like a teddy bear! You keep checking the weights because there is no way that it should feel as heavy as it is.

But it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.

Anyone can train hard when they feel like it. But the difference in results comes with the less-than-spectacular workouts – the “punch the clock” workouts.

” Not all workouts have to look like a scene from “Pumping Iron.” In fact, I often argue that these moderate workouts…the punch the clock workouts…are the ones that make champions. Hell, everyone is willing to work hard the week of the State Championship: I think what separates champions is the willingness to just get “them”…the workouts…in.”
-Dan John

Sometimes you just have to “clock in and do work” as Robert Dos Remedios says.

Consistency is a major key to success in any area. Sometimes it’s just getting another session done…

I always suggest to clients that they set a goal of X workouts in Y number of days/weeks. Of course we want to set records, and have great workouts – but there is a need for just being consistent with the training sessions and just checking them off.


AC

Just like your workouts, some days you wakeboard better than you do on other days.  The most important thing to do is go out, have fun, and try to get better every time that you ride.

It is the days that you aren’t riding well that determine how much you improve and “it might just be those sessions that are the difference makers in the long term.”

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

P.S. – For more info and articles from Alwyn Cosgrove – Check out alwyncosgrove.com

Short Term High-Intensity Interval Training (HIT) As Effective As Moderate Long Term Endurance Exercise, Study

Here is yet another article/study about the many benefits of interval training.

Click HERE to read the article.

Be sure to let me know what you think about the article and the study in the comments section.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

Wakeboarding General Training Principles – Overload

This is the second installment in a 3 part series.  This series will cover the 3 general training principles that apply to any type of training program – specificity, overload, progression

Overload – assigning a workout or training regime of greater intensity that the athlete is accustomed to.

Without the overload principle, even a well designed program will greatly limit an athlete’s ability to make improvements.

One obvious application of the overload principle, in a resistance training program, involves an increasing the load (weight) lifted during an exercise.  Other changes that can be made to “overload” include: increasing the number of sessions per week (or per day in some instances), adding exercises or sets, emphasize complex over simple exercises, decrease length of rest period between sets and exercises, or any combination of these or other changes.

As long as the body is stressed at higher level than it is used to, an overload will occur.

When the body is properly overloaded, overtraining is avoided and the desired training adaptation will occur.

Be sure to make sure you “overload” in order to take your wakeboarding to the next level.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS