Trampoline Training

I was just going through a bunch of old emails and either deleting them or putting them into folders, in an attempt to become more organized, and came across this article.  In the article it gives a couple of different exercises that can be performed using a trampoline in order to improve your core strength and also your wakeboarding. 

 The article talks about using a smaller trampoline that is often found in many health clubs and fitness centers, but there is no reason that these exercises can’t be performed on a full size trampoline. 

If you are not already using a trampoline in order to improve your wakeboarding, you NEED to start.  Trampolines are a great, safe way, to learn new tricks that you are trying to land on the water.  By using a trampoline to perfect your new move before you head out on the water, it can save you a lot of time, and also some pain from not falling as much. 

There will be more to come on trampoline training later, but for now, read the article below and let me know if you have anymore exercises that can be performed using a trampoline.

Roger Ernst II, CSCS

 

 

Trampoline Training: Bounce Your Way to a Rock Hard Core

 

Kyle Brown, CSCS

 

When you mention the word trampoline, most people recall fond childhood memories of playing outside bouncing into the air as if they are defying gravity. Yet few people are aware of not only the health benefits of a trampoline but the tremendous core training benefits. Moreover, they do not know that many gyms and personal training studios now have mini indoor versions of trampolines called rebounders that elicit the same benefits. By bouncing on a trampoline, you are harnessing the force of gravity to strengthen every cell in your body. 

 

Your core muscles include all muscles from your abdominal, lower lumbar, and pelvic regions. They are responsible for supporting your spine and providing you balance and stability. Traditional core training involves movements like sit ups, crunches, bridges, and planks. Yet many athletes including many gymnasts have been able to develop incredibly powerful core muscles without any of these exercises. This is due to the tremendous amount of core strength required to stabilize in their sport. And the trampoline is a perfect example of a sport that requires and develops tremendous core strength.

 

When you bounce off a trampoline, you end up suspended in air and then land with twice the force of gravity, which challenges your body to grow stronger (1).  You constantly use your abdominal muscles with rebounder exercises to stabilize, maintain balance and postural control, and control the height of your jump.  Repeatedly bouncing up and down on trampolines develops proficiency for bracing the torso with intra-abdominal pressure and improves your core muscular endurance by maintaining an isometric contraction of the abdominals (1).

 

Trampoline training forces your body to use your core muscles as well as proprioceptors in order to balance.  Proprioceptors are specialized receptors that are located in the muscles, joints, tendons/ligaments, and the inner ear that provide information that enables your body to know where it is located in space and if necessary adjust posture or movement in order to maintain balance (1).  Proprioceptor training will work your core muscles as well as the rest of your musculature, joints, etc., thus improving your overall strength and balance. When you jump on a trampoline, every muscle in your body works simultaneously to adjust the body’s position to its constantly changing environment.

 

There are many exercises you can do to train your core on a rebounder. Here are a couple examples:

 

Sprint in Place

Stand in the middle of the trampoline and drive your knee up to your chest while simultaneously swinging up your opposite arm. Work at maximal output for 30 seconds to a minute.

 

Double Knee Ups

Stand in the middle of the trampoline and jump in the air as high as possible driving both knees to your chest.  Land and immediately repeat. The goal is to jump as high as possible

 

Side to Side Jumps

On either one or both legs, bounce from one side of the trampoline to the other.

 

Planks on Trampoline

Put your feet on the ground and your fists and elbows on the trampoline in plank position underneath your chest. Prop yourself up like a table or bridge using your toes and elbows. Use your gluteals and abdominals to stabilize.

 

Jump Twists

Use your core to twist your hips and keep your feet together while bouncing up and down.

 

References

1. Carter, Albert. (1998). Rebound To Better Health. National Institute of Reboundology and Health. Springville, UT.

  1. October 19, 2009 at 12:47 am

    Great tutorial! I think using a trampoline can really help improve my wakeboarding skills. Thanks!

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